Yesterday, a powerful storm tore the ship in half as it was cruising in the South China Sea 160 nautical miles southwest of Hong Kong. Hong Kong officials have revealed stunning video footage of a helicopter airlifting a survivor while hovering above the sinking ship when it was mostly underwater and being battered by waves, despite the fact that rescue operations had been impeded by the constantly terrible weather. Despite being battered by strong gusts and rain that prompted business closures and disrupted public transit, Hong Kong was fortunate to avoid the brunt of tropical storm Chaba.

Three people have reportedly been saved, and they have reportedly told police that their other crew members were likely carried off by the strong waves prior to the arrival of rescuers. The survivors are currently being treated at a nearby hospital. After the fierce storm caused substantial damage, the crew abandoned ship, according to the Hong Kong Government Flying Service. On the same day that Hong Kong was transferred from Britain to China 25 years ago, tropical storm Chaba made landfall. Chinese President Xi Jinping had just arrived when a typhoon warning was issued on Thursday. Tropical storm Chaba caused a 30-person engineering vessel to capsize in the waters around Hong Kong; the majority of the crew is still at sea as of this writing. The initial rescue efforts included the employment of four Hong Kong rescue helicopters, a number of fixed-wing aircraft, and a rescue boat provided by mainland Chinese authorities.

In light of the fact that there are already more than twenty people missing at sea, rescue efforts will go on day and night with a growing search area. However, the engineering vessel capsized in the nearby waters under 10-meter-high waves and gusts of 144 kilometer per hour. Yesterday afternoon, the storm’s authenticity was compromised when it approached Zhanjiang in the Guangdong Province of China. This was due to the storm’s status being downgraded to signal number 3.

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