Home Blog

Thailand Long Term Resident Visa (LTR) – Starting September 1st

Thailand will start to offer a 10 year Long Term Resident Visa (LTR) starting September 1st which will be targeting the following categories:

  • Wealthy Global Citizen
    Wealthy individuals holding at least USD 1 million in assets
  • Wealthy Pensioner
    Retirees aged 50 years and older who have an annual pension or stable income
  • Work From Thailand Professional / Nomad
    Remote workers working for well-established overseas companies
  • Highly Skilled Professional
    Professionals or experts in targeted industries working for business entities or higher education institutes or research centers or specialized training institutions in Thailand or Thai government agencies
  • Dependents
    Spouse and children under 20 years old of LTR visa holders (Maximum 4 dependents in total per one LTR visa holder)

Long Term Resident Visa Privileges

There will be many privileges for LTR visa holders that will make living in Thailand long term easier and less bureaucratic. These privileges include: discounted personal income tax rate, the removal of the requirement for employers to hire four Thai citizens per foreigner, fast track at international airports, 1 year reporting to Immigration instead of 90 days, and the overall ease of regulations concerning foreign residents. The LTR Visa program makes the process of hiring foreigners easier and the foreign experts hired will strengthen the private business sector of Thailand.

  • 10* years renewable visa
  • Exemption from 4 Thais to 1 foreigner employment requirement ratio
  • 90-day report extended to 1-year report and exemption of re-entry permit
  • Permission to work in Thailand (Digital Work permit)
  • 17% Personal income tax for High-skilled professionals
  • Immigration and work permit facilitation services

While not everyone will be able to qualify this visa will be a great addition for select working professionals, and retirees.

You can read more information about the Long Term Resident Visa Requirements (LTR) Here.

A 40-ton bonfire of illegal drugs was lit today to burn drugs.

0


Before today’s large chemical conflagration, inspections were undertaken by the FDA, the Office of the Narcotics Control Board, the Royal Thai Police, the major city Nonthaburi police station, the Department of Medical Sciences, the Office of Police Forensic Science, and the Royal Thai Army. Cannabis users frequently assume that Thailand’s decision to legalize cannabis marks a departure from the nation’s prior policy on the drug, which would have made Thailand the only country in the region with such lax laws on cannabis product usage. Due to the concurrent emergence of hundreds of new marijuana-related businesses, especially in Bangkok and online, the authorities are in a tricky legal situation. Leaders of the BMA claim that all extra limitations will be imposed throughout Thailand, not only in one particular region. The fact that Khao San Road is a part of a broader community that includes schools and temples was also underlined. Organizations from the public and commercial sectors, companies, and academic institutions have all been forced to share their perspectives on the evolving situation.

The laws that will govern cannabis products in the future will be codified by a bill that is now being discussed in parliament. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration has received creative recommendations from shop owners and street sellers to transform Khao San Road into an Asian Amsterdam. A legal wasteland has developed as a result of the delay between the first announcement and the passing of laws. Thailand’s “image may suffer if Khao San Road is turned into a cannabis hotspot owing to the lack of regulation that assures all goods offered are safe and of great quality,” the deputy governor of Bangkok Jakkapan Phiewngam warned the Bangkok Post. In the next days, other psychoactive substances will also be condemned. Prior to the high-profile burn-off, cannabis, one of the old category 5 illegal substances, had been the topic of discussion for almost a month (and its many herbal variants). To calm the commotion caused by the June 9 declaration decriminalizing marijuana in Thailand, political leaders, management, and law enforcement personnel have already begun their efforts. Today and tomorrow, officials will burn almost 40 tonnes of drugs that were seized from traffickers who were apprehended while making deliveries and found during searches. Over the following two days, it’s expected that unlawful goods with a market worth of more than 25 billion baht will be destroyed. Some of the unique ingredients include 14,482 kilos of crystal meth, 23,365 kilos of methamphetamine tablets, 738 kilos of heroin, 29 kilos of opium, 4 kilos of ecstasy, and 738 kilos of heroin. Since June 9, Thai authorities have hurriedly implemented a number of additional cannabis-related regulations. They took this step because they were concerned that the long-planned liberalization of the drug may encourage anyone, including children, to use it freely.


Before today’s large chemical conflagration, inspections were undertaken by the FDA, the Office of the Narcotics Control Board, the Royal Thai Police, the major city Nonthaburi police station, the Department of Medical Sciences, the Office of Police Forensic Science, and the Royal Thai Army. Cannabis users frequently assume that Thailand’s decision to legalize cannabis marks a departure from the nation’s prior policy on the drug, which would have made Thailand the only country in the region with such lax laws on cannabis product usage. Due to the concurrent emergence of hundreds of new marijuana-related businesses, especially in Bangkok and online, the authorities are in a tricky legal situation. Leaders of the BMA claim that all extra limitations will be imposed throughout Thailand, not only in one particular region. The fact that Khao San Road is a part of a broader community that includes schools and temples was also underlined. Organizations from the public and commercial sectors, companies, and academic institutions have all been forced to share their perspectives on the evolving situation.

Thailand travel is hampered by inflation and rising fuel costs

0

In comparison to life prior to the pandemic, only 30% of international flights land in The Land of Smiles, according to Governor Yuthasak Supasorn of the Tourism Authority of Thailand. The TAT and the Ministry of Tourism and Sports have been praising the quick recovery of Thai tourism, but they are now acknowledging the difficulties faced by foreign visitors, which are beyond the control of Thai officials. By the end of 2022, Thailand expects the upcoming peak season to bring in up to 10 million visitors, but fewer international aircraft are arriving due to inflation and rising fuel expenses. Travelers from China and Russia will be hard to find for the remainder of 2022 at the very least. Additionally, there are issues with flights being canceled or experiencing significant delays in both Europe and the US.


At least 55 percent of foreign flights should be the target, and this may be feasible after Air Canada and Korean Air confirm their nonstop travel schedules. They point to rising fuel prices as the reason of greater operational costs, and longer flights as a result of detours made to escape the conflict between Russia and Ukraine.


“Tourists confront higher travel expenditures, mainly due to inflation and airfares, which have climbed by 20–40 percent,” said the statement. The TAT is collaborating with both scheduled and charter airlines to launch joint promotions that will help defray those expenses.


Air Canada intends to operate its first direct connection between Vancouver and Bangkok with four flights per week from December through April 2023 using Boeing 787 aircraft. Korean Air assured the TAT during a recent trip to Seoul that it will resume flights to Thailand in the fourth quarter. According to many airline firms, there are several global difficulties hurting their revenue and ability to increase frequency of flights, thus they are hesitant to add more routes or expand the number of flights.