According to data from the National Water Resources Office, the twelve natural floodplains located north of Bangkok are perilously near to meeting their maximum water storage capacity (NWRO). As a result of the recent run of storms, the floodplains that ordinarily absorb floodwater and safeguard the capital from river overflows have reached their maximum capacity.

The 12 water-retention sites in the lower Chao Phraya River Basin cover a total area of 1.15 million rai (184,000 hectares) and have the capacity to store roughly 1.5 billion cubic meters of additional water.

In low-lying areas, the majority of the landscape is composed of rice fields. Before the onset of the monsoon, which is characterized by protracted periods of heavy rainfall and flooding at the nation’s higher elevations, farmers in the region usually harvest their crops. As soon as economically crucial places, including Bangkok, are no longer threatened by river overflows, the Royal Irrigation Department pumps floodwater out of the lowlands in preparation for the next planting season. This is particularly true in Thailand. The 12 water retention areas are Thung Chiang Rak, Thung Tha Wung, Chai Nat-Pasak Canal’s Left Plain, Thung Bang Kum, Thung Bang Kung, Thung Bang Ban-Baan Pan, Thung Pa Mok, Thung Pak Hai, Thung Chao Chet, Thung Pho Phraya, Phraya Banlue Operation and Maintenance Project, and Southern Rangsit Operation and Maintenance Project. The Thung Bang Kum and Thung Bang Kung reservoirs have retained more water than their combined capacity of 160 million cubic meters, according to the NWRO. The majority of the remaining plains are currently between 64 and 82% of their capacity. This week, the Thai Meteorological Department predicts more widespread and strong precipitation throughout the entire nation.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments