The Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries issued a caution to international visitors, telling them not to bring in any fresh fruits, vegetables, or harvests without permission. If the instructions are disregarded, the perpetrator might be punished to three years in prison and a fine of one million yen, which is roughly 263,000 baht.


Japan has extremely rigorous import rules, notably for plants and crops, to prevent the spread of plant diseases. At airport immigration checks, there are occasionally dogs trained to detect prohibited narcotics and goods.


Today, the Thai Ministry of Commerce issued a warning to Thai citizens not to bring into Japan any fresh fruits, vegetables, cereals, flowers, plant seeds, sprouts, or other plant products.


The Ministry of Commerce stressed that almost all Thai fruits, even those varieties that Thailand normally sells on Japanese markets, were prohibited.


Certain dried goods are allowed, but only with the proper phytosanitary certification. These foods include rice, millet, corn, buckwheat, wheat, soybeans, red beans, peanuts, chocolate, tamarind, coriander seed, dried flowers, herbs, and spices.


The great majority of dried and frozen plant products may be purchased without the necessary phytosanitary certification because they are meant for consumption rather than cultivation. On the other hand, these items will be inspected at airport security checkpoints.


You can view a list of the plants that are restricted or prohibited in Japan at this location.


On the list of prohibited items include meats, animal products, dairy products, some medications, insects, soil, counterfeit designer goods, and any child pornography. In addition, Japanese law prohibits carrying more than 1 million yen (about 263,000 baht) in cash.


If you intend to transport more than one million yen in cash, you must notify Japan’s Customs Department in advance.

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