Morbakka fenneri, the “fire jellyfish,” gets its name from its painful sting, not from its pinkish-red colour. Yesterday, tens of thousands of tiny yet dangerous fire jellyfish washed up on Hong Island in Krabi’s Than Bok Khorani National Park. The jellyfish is likely to have arrived on the island due to a shift in wind direction.

Weerasak Sisatchang, the national park’s director, warned that fire jellyfish are extremely dangerous, and that being stung by one might cause terrible pain or even death if an allergic reaction arises. Apply vinegar to the injured region as soon as possible if you’ve been stung by a fire jellyfish. After enormous amounts of “fire jellyfish” washed up on the beach in Krabi, southern Thailand, red flags were posted yesterday to warn tourists not to swim. The fire jellyfish will die in 1–2 days, according to park guards. Visitors to Hong Island will be able to swim again after that.

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