TAT’s primary target demographics include business trip groups, senior citizens, independent travelers, female friend and family groups, and outdoor adventurers. Longer journeys will be rewarded with savings on services like hotels and spas, according to Yuthasak. In the final three months of the year, TAT will launch a new collaboration campaign named “It’s Time to Go to Thailand,” according to TAT Governor Yuthasak Supasorn. In order to generate 75 billion baht, TAT hopes to bring at least 1.25 million Japanese tourists to Thailand in 2023. After Thai VietJet announced the addition of flights to both the Bangkok-Fukuoka route to Japan, word of this campaign broke.

The Thailand Tourism Authority wants to increase the number of Japanese visitors. TAT intends to exert pressure on seven significant travel operators to get Japanese visitors to stay longer in Thailand. Beginning on October 1, Thai VietJet will operate five weekly flights, Monday through Saturday, between Bangkok and Fukuoka. The campaign intends to improve Japanese tourists’ average trip expenditure, which is now the lowest among Northeast Asian markets at only 6,400 baht. 166,709 Japanese tourists had entered the monarchy as of September 20. There were 1.8 million Japanese visitors to Thailand in 2019.

The yen is currently “historically weak,” according to Yuthasak, making TAT’s efforts more difficult. In order to justify their first outbound visits in two or three years, he stated, “we have to convince them to spend more time.” TAT is expecting to bring about 1.25 million Japanese tourists the next year.

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