Naresuan University researchers are investigating the monkeypox virus in wastewater at Suvarnabhumi Airport. The second case of the virus in Thailand since the global pandemic began in May of this year has been discovered in a Thai guy in Bangkok. Testing wastewater could find local epidemics early because the virus can be discovered in feces long before symptoms show. Anutin Charnvirakul, the public health minister, announced at 2:30 p.m. that the Ministry of Health had verified the positive outcome from Bangkok’s Wachira Hospital. The Thai man, 47, first felt ill on July 12. Two days later, the patient developed a fever, aches all over their body, and swollen lymph nodes. A week later, the man went to the hospital for evaluation after developing a rash that covered his genitalia, body, face, and arms. Due to their regular interaction, 10 members of a Bangkok family are at a very high risk of contracting the virus from Dr. Opas Karnkawinpong, director-general of the Department of Disease Control.


If an outbreak of monkeypox does arise in Thailand, people can be inoculated using 40-year-old stacked smallpox vaccines that are 85% effective at preventing the disease. The only case of monkeypox currently recognized to have occurred in Thailand is the one that left Phuket and was found hiding in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, last week after exceeding his visa in Thailand. The 27-year-old rian national is accused of swimming over the Sa Kaeo River. The patient told the medical professionals that he had sex with a foreign male, who he believes to be the infection’s source. He will be hospitalized in isolation for 21 days. Each of the 10 will have a virus test; they will then be watched for symptoms and given another test after 21 days. If you have a fever, headache, muscle or back pain, enlarged lymph nodes, chills, exhaustion, a rash, or skin lesions, get in touch with a hospital to schedule a monkeypox virus test.

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