Thailand has begun screening incoming travelers from abroad for monkeypox, using the Thailand Pass system. The international disease control and quarantine office at Suvarnabhumi airport is being set up to handle an outbreak of the virus in the capital’s main international airport.

Screenshot of the Report your symptom button on Thailand Pass
Screenshot of the Thailand Pass mokeypox symptom report page


Travelers might not have any signs of the illness before they leave, but they might start to feel sick once they get to Thailand. Symptoms include a sore throat, headache, muscle pain, back pain, rash, blisters, and scabs.

Passengers who have recently been to or lived in countries where monkeypox has been seen will be given more attention.

When people arrive at Suvarnabhumi Airport, they must scan a QR code to get a “health beware card.” People who get monkeypox are put on a watch list and told to see a doctor at the nearest hospital as soon as possible.

The government of Thailand has not said that monkeypox is contagious, and no cases have been found there.

Chakkarat Pittayawong-anont, the head of epidemiology at DDC, said that foreign tourists had already been checked out on Tuesday. Now, more than 10,000 people visit every day, and no infectious diseases have been found.

As mentioned in the Thailand Pass Health Report form you are only supposed to submit it if you have symptoms, or have been exposed to Monkeypox.

Signs and Symptoms

In humans, the symptoms of monkeypox are similar to but milder than the symptoms of smallpox. Monkeypox begins with fever, headache, muscle aches, and exhaustion. The main difference between symptoms of smallpox and monkeypox is that monkeypox causes lymph nodes to swell (lymphadenopathy) while smallpox does not. The incubation period (time from infection to symptoms) for monkeypox is usually 7−14 days but can range from 5−21 days.

The illness begins with:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches
  • Backache
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Chills
  • Exhaustion

Within 1 to 3 days (sometimes longer) after the appearance of fever, the patient develops a rash, often beginning on the face then spreading to other parts of the body.

Lesions progress through the following stages before falling off:

  • Macules
  • Papules
  • Vesicles
  • Pustules
  • Scabs

The illness typically lasts for 2−4 weeks. In Africa, monkeypox has been shown to cause death in as many as 1 in 10 persons who contract the disease.

Transmission

Transmission of monkeypox virus occurs when a person comes into contact with the virus from an animal, human, or materials contaminated with the virus. The virus enters the body through broken skin (even if not visible), respiratory tract, or the mucous membranes (eyes, nose, or mouth). Animal-to-human transmission may occur by bite or scratch, bush meat preparation, direct contact with body fluids or lesion material, or indirect contact with lesion material, such as through contaminated bedding. Human-to-human transmission is thought to occur primarily through large respiratory droplets. Respiratory droplets generally cannot travel more than a few feet, so prolonged face-to-face contact is required. Other human-to-human methods of transmission include direct contact with body fluids or lesion material, and indirect contact with lesion material, such as through contaminated clothing or linens.

Can I still travel to Thailand?

Yes you can still travel to Thailand, as long as you obtain your Thailand Covid Insurance, and your Thailand Pass.

If you experience any symptoms you can report them through the Thailand Pass system to reduce the possible risk of contracting, and spreading monkeypox.

What do you think?

While multiple sources have been reporting the possible removal of the Thailand Pass system at the end of July it would appear that it has become a useful digital tool to do pre-screening.
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Jojo
Jojo
6 months ago

Monkeypox is fake news… I aint no monkey!

JasonGuy
JasonGuy
Reply to  Jojo
6 months ago

You don’t have to be a monkey, humans can get it too.

Merijn
Merijn
6 months ago
While multiple sources have been reporting the possible removal of the Thailand Pass system at the end of July it…" Read more »

There are always contagious deceases and the TP will not prevent this. But the TP will prevent of many people travelling to Thailand and should be removed asap.